It's not just Holiday Season, it's Tuberculinum Season

The beginning of winter in our North American climate is marked by the frenzied holiday season. Most people will explain this frenzy as merely a symptom of the season – more social engagements, more travelling or hosting, more gifts to buy, more home decorating, even more cooking than at other times of year. But there is another, internal culprit that contributes to this heightened activity. It is one of the miasms, called Tuberculinum.

In short, a miasm is an inherited predisposition. Inherited predispositions manifest within us physically, emotionally and at the levels of the soul and spirit. Most of us have elements of several of them, but some suffer from their effects more than others. Miasms are with us all year, but they have seasonal affinities, so different miasms flare up at different times of the year. As you may have guessed, the word ‘Tuberculinum’ is related to Tuberculosis, so it’s no surprise that the physical manifestations of this miasm will often result in lung issues. Ever get a nasty chest cold or flu-like symptoms around the holidays? It’s not just the parties and the cookies – if this is a pattern for you Tuberculinum is likely showing its face. It may not be a cold or flu that you have been suffering from, but rather your body’s attempt to resolve this disturbance called Tuberculinum.

One response I often hear when I explain this is “No, it was a cold because everyone in the family got it”, or “It’s going around at school”. That is not necessarily the case, because everyone in the family may have the same underlying susceptibilty (remember it’s an inherited predisposition). The other kids at school who are suffering likely have the same miasm in their family. Remember, we are exposed to bacteria and viruses constantly, but it’s our susceptability at any given time that typically causes us to feel sick and develop symptoms. The presence of a miasm in you contributes significantly to this susceptability.

People with lung, bronchial, breathing issues are typically heavily influenced by this miasm. Symptoms could be chronic, situation-induced (for example, exposure to an allergen that acts as a trigger) or a pattern in which ‘every cold goes to the chest’. These situations all point to Tuberculinum, which can be treated with Medical Heilkunst.

There are a number of emotional symptoms that point to this miasm, but the key state of mind of Tuberculinum is restlessness. People who are constantly moving, changing jobs, changing relationships or redecorating their homes are often Tubercular. Even people who are constantly looking for the ‘next new thing’ in health advice or supplements are likely suffering from the effects of Tuberculinum.

While these patterns may seem harmless in the short term, they point to the presence of this miasm, the potential for greater extremes as time passes and eventual physical and emotional manifestations. Children with a strong Tubercular influence are often labelled AD/HD, Oppositionally Defiant and other similar labels. I remember well my daughter’s Tubercular tantrums when she was younger – they brought a whole new meaning to the terrible twos..and threes and fours! By treating for this miasm through Heilkunst, kids can lose the label and function more effectively in life.

So this year when holiday frenzy hits, look a little deeper than the external demands of the season, to the internal demands of your body (or all four of your bodies – see the video essay on your four bodies) trying to resolve this deeper issue called Tuberculinum.

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The beginning of winter in our North American climate is marked by the frenzied holiday season. Most people will explain this frenzy as merely a symptom of the season…

 
Wendy Knight Agard

Copyright 2006-2017 Wendy Knight Agard.